Today is Thursday, August 24, 2017

"Frost-quake" startles Wilson Countians

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JASON ALLEN / The Wilson Post

Several residents in Wilson County reported hearing a loud booming sound early Thursday morning.
Matt Reagan, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, explained that the sound is commonly referred to as a "frost-quake."
"When we get this kind of heavy precipitation the water gets into the ground and freezes. When water freezes it expands rapidly and causes tension in the soil," he said. "That is what caused the loud noise. Other than that it is harmless."
Reagan said when they heard the noise at their office in Old Hickory, several employees believed a tree had fallen. "We had a lot of reports of something similar on our Facebook page," he said.
There is a Winter Storm watch in effect until Saturday morning.
Reagan said folks in Lebanon can expect up to an inch of snow and sleet on Friday and some freezing rain. The high for Saturday is predicted to be in the upper 40s and the NWS is forecasting rain, which Reagan added will melt some of the snow and ice.
"It is going to melt. It could less to some minor street issues. As the ice melts you could get some pooling on the roads."
Wilson County Road Superintendent Steve Lynch believes that the rain could make the roads slicker. He compared them to the way a piece of ice becomes slippery before melting in a glass of water.
"The main roads are fine, but many back roads are not," he said on Thursday.
He said truck drivers have worked 50-60 hours of overtime this week to keep the roads salted and bladed.

Staff Writer Sabrina Garrett may be contacted at sgarrett@wilsonpost.com.

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cold, frostquake, weather, winter
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